IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 629: From Politics to Prosopography: Britain and Ireland in the 12th and 13th Centuries, II - Approaches to Editing Medieval Documents in the Digital Age

Tuesday 14 July 2009, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Paradox of Medieval Scotland, 1093-1286, University of Glasgow / The Fine Rolls of Henry III, King's College London
Organiser:Paul R. Dryburgh, Henry III Fine Rolls Project, Department of History, King's College London
Moderator/Chair:John Bradley, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
Paper 629-aAn Introduction to the PoMS Database
(Language: English)
Amanda Beam, The Paradox of Medieval Scotland, 1093-1286, Department of History (Scottish), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Computing in Medieval Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 629-bGetting the Database to Talk History: New Designs in PoMS
(Language: English)
Michele Pasin, Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Computing in Medieval Studies
Paper 629-cEditing Cycle in a Collaborative Digital Project: The Henry III Fine Rolls Project, A Case Study
(Language: English)
Tamara L. Lopez, Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
Index terms: Administration, Computing in Medieval Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

This session, proposed by two AHRC-funded research projects – The Paradox of Medieval Scotland (Glasgow) and Fine Rolls of Henry III (KCL) – will discuss the opportunities and challenges which technology presents for the future of editing and publishing medieval documents. It will focus principally on constructing digital models to represent the form and content of the original manuscript and to enhance its accessibility and usability. In introducing potential users to the PoMs database, it will explore new possibilities in prosopographical study, demonstrating the nuances of charters as sources in that context. Combined with an analysis of the editing cycle in the Fine Rolls technical edition, it will also compare the marriage between standards, both editorial and technological, print and web, in digital projects of close historical themes to ensure that the primacy of the manuscript and published (printed) edition are not compromised.