IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 714: Two Men and a Building: Astrology and Religious Heresy in Medieval Europe

Tuesday 14 July 2009, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Darrelyn Gunzburg, Department of History of Art, University of Bristol
Moderator/Chair:Patrick Curry, School of European Culture & Languages, University of Kent
Paper 714-aA Consideration of the First Floor Salone of the Palazzo della Ragione, Padova, Italy, as an Astrological Document
(Language: English)
Darrelyn Gunzburg, Department of History of Art, University of Bristol
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 714-bThe Astrology Practiced by Galileo as Displayed in his Collection of Astrological Notes Known as the Astrologica nonnulla
(Language: English)
Bernadette Brady, Bath Spa University
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 714-cKepler's Personal and Theoretical Astrology
(Language: English)
Dorian Gieseler Greenbaum, Warburg Institute, University of London
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Abstract

Even though it was deemed to be religious heresy in terms of Christian doctrine, and denounced by the Church Fathers, astrology in the medieval period and into the 16th century, transmitted through Jewish, Christian, and Islamic astrologers, was an inherent part of the culture. While it co-existed uneasily with official disapproval and denunciation, textual and art historical documents clearly demonstrate its underpinnings and contribution to medieval life. In this session, two men – Galileo and Kepler – and a building – the Palazzo della Ragione, Padova – throw light on how astrology was also a respected and integral part of the culture.