IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1101: Obedience and Disobedience in Anglo-Saxon England

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Program in Medieval Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Organiser:Jill Fitzgerald, Department of English / Program in Medieval Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Moderator/Chair:Daniel Anlezark, Department of English, University of Sydney
Paper 1101-aRules to Live by: Molding the Monastic Body
(Language: English)
Renée R. Trilling, Department of English, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Monasticism
Paper 1101-bRules of God and Man: Wulfstan on the Fall of the Angels
(Language: English)
Jill Fitzgerald, Department of English / Program in Medieval Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Language and Literature - Old English, Sermons and Preaching
Paper 1101-cGod, Satan, and the Social Rules of Exchange in Ælfric's Catholic Homily I.1
(Language: English)
Stephanie Clark, Department of English, University of Oregon
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Language and Literature - Old English, Sermons and Preaching
Abstract

This session features papers that explore how Anglo-Saxons conceptualized rules handed down by ‘higher authorities’ in poetry and prose. Paper A deals with monastic consuetudinaries and the formation of the subject through adherence to these rules. Paper B examines the alignment of divine and institutional rules in Wulfstan’s Sermo Lupi ad Anglos and suggests that the central anxieties of lord-betrayal, pride, and rebellion found in the fall of the angels narrative are mapped onto this sermon to illustrate the Christian nation’s failure to hold proper relations to authority. Finally, Paper C discusses the representation of both the fall of Satan and Adam and Eve in Ælfric’s Catholic Homily I.1. By examining Anglo-Saxon perceptions of gift-giving this paper considers how, from Satan’s perspective, God seems to violate the rules of reciprocity. This panel aims to generate some fresh scholarly inquiry into the ways in which Anglo-Saxons understood the relationship between culturally and divinely authorized rules through a combination of cultural, linguistic, exegetical, and theoretical approaches.