IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1122: Letters, Privileges, and Rules: Authority in the Church

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 11.15-12.45

Moderator/Chair:Greta Austin, Department of Religion, University of Puget Sound, Washington
Paper 1122-aMeasuring Sin in Alexander III's Decretals
(Language: English)
Carolina Gual da Silva, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil / École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris
Index terms: Canon Law, Religious Life, Sermons and Preaching
Paper 1122-bRules for the Ruler: Measures of Control over the Early Spanish Inquisition
(Language: English)
Barbara Santiago Medina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Susana Cabezas Fontanilla, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Social History
Abstract

Paper -a:
Is it possible to measure the severity of sin? Through an analysis of Alexander III’s decretals regarding the duration of penitence, the number of fast days and the people to whom one should report to redeem sins, this paper will discuss the possibility of establishing a scale of sins both in the religious and juridical sense of the term. The object of the study contemplates the decretals by Alexander III present in Book V of the Liber Extra dealing with sins and crimes such as slandering, theft, murder, infanticide, and others committed by laymen.

Paper -b:
In Early Modern Spain, the Inquisition gained a total control of the Spanish society in different aspects of life. One of the most important measures of control over its own local courts was possibly to conduct an internal investigation within them. These inspections were entrusted to a specific inquisitor by the ‘Suprema’ and were called ‘visitas’. As an auditor, the inquisitor revises activities related to organization and functioning of the court and kept an eye over the morality of its members. Among other things he rules legal, management and economic issues and supervises the treatment of prisoners, the archive management and the way documents are meant to be written.