IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 117: Legislation, Custom, or Muddling Through?: Making the Rules Work inside English Monasteries

Monday 9 July 2012, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Organiser:Catherine E. L├ęglu, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Moderator/Chair:Anne Lawrence-Mathers, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Paper 117-aTime and Punishment: The Implementation of the Monastic Horarium in Anglo-Saxon England
(Language: English)
Anne Tarassenko, Department of History, University of Reading
Index terms: Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Monasticism, Technology
Paper 117-bThe 'Outside' Within: The Lay Sick and the Regulation of Sacred Space
(Language: English)
Ruth Salter, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Index terms: Hagiography, Medicine, Monasticism
Paper 117-cLectio Divina and Suspect Texts: The Monastic Library as Frontier Zone
(Language: English)
Maria Carolina Escobar-Vargas, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Index terms: Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Manuscripts and Palaeography, Monasticism
Abstract

Monastic reformers, with the Cistercians prominent amongst them, placed emphasis on getting ‘back to the Rule’. This session looks at three areas where implementing the Rule could be especially difficult in practice, even though all three were central to Benedictine life. The first is the monastic horarium in the 11th century, the complexity of the chronological calculations, and the punishments for erring timekeepers. The second is the acceptance of the lay sick, male and female, within areas of monastic space supposedly closed to them. The final paper looks at the lectio divina, and at how texts on problematic subjects such as astrology appeared in monastic manuscripts.