IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1201: Understanding Landed Society in Late Anglo-Saxon England

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Battle Conference on Anglo-Norman Studies / Haskins Society for Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Norman, Angevin & Viking History
Organiser:Chris Lewis, Department of History, King's College London / Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Emily A. Winkler, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Paper 1201-aThe Making of Domesday Book: The Hampshire Folios Reconsidered
(Language: English)
Katherine Blayney, Department of History, King's College London
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Local History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1201-bDanish Landowners in 11th-Century Wessex
(Language: English)
Chris Lewis, Department of History, King's College London / Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Local History, Onomastics, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1201-cNames and Landholders in Pre-Conquest Dorset
(Language: English)
Duncan Probert, 'Profile of a Doomed Elite' Project, King's College London
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Onomastics, Social History
Abstract

At Leeds 2011 we introduced the Leverhulme-funded research project ‘Profile of a Doomed Elite: The Structure of English Landed Society in 1066’. At the 2012 Congress we propose to present some of the rich findings from our thoroughgoing prosopographical investigation of English landowners in 1066. We are taking a region, the royal heartland of Wessex, and using three intersecting approaches to understanding the structure of landed society there: first, a ‘ground-clearing exercise’ which shows what can be gained by a fuller understanding of how Domesday Book was compiled; second, consideration whether the Danish Conquest of 1016 had lasting effects on the personnel and structure of landed society in the region; and third, the history and social meaning of personal naming in the families of the region. The example of Wessex points the way towards a better understanding of landed society in England generally.