IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1213: Monastic Rules as Rules for the World, II

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Sächsische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Leipzig
Organiser:Gert Melville, Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG), Technische Universität Dresden
Moderator/Chair:Jörg Sonntag, Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG), Technische Universität Dresden
Paper 1213-aChanging the Context: Monastic Norms of Morals and Behaviour as Rules for the World
(Language: English)
Mirko Breitenstein, Sächsische Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Leipzig / Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG), Technische Universität Dresden
Index terms: Mentalities, Monasticism, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 1213-bThe Change of Propositum within the Carmelite Order: From the Desert into the World
(Language: English)
Coralie Zermatten, Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG), Technische Universität Dresden
Index terms: Administration, Crusades, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 1213-cThe Charisma of the Dominican Constitutions in the 13th Century
(Language: English)
Florent Cygler, Département d'histoire, Université de Nantes / Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG), Technische Universität Dresden
Index terms: Law, Monasticism, Politics and Diplomacy, Religious Life
Abstract

Abstract paper a: ‘The Process of civilisation’ means the change of people’s structure of personality. Norbert Elias described this as a transformation of external constraints into self-constraints, which he identified especially in courtly culture of the Middle Ages. But, in particular, high medieval monastic treatises of spiritual advice contributed to this process to a great extent as well. The paper seeks to examine this special contribution of monasticism to the formation of European culture, and, in doing so, to show the innovative potential of the vita religiosa for secular society.

Abstract paper b: After the Carmelites had left the Holy Land to settle down in Europe, their survival depended on a change of propositum. Indeed, the Bull of Innocent IV from 1247 imposed them to let their eremitical life apart and to become Mendicants. The Holy See granted them a right to perpetuate themselves as long as they got active in the world. To become a recognised Order, the Carmelites had to fit in the society. But how could the Carmelites change their propositum without changing their Rule?

Abstract paper c: The constitutions that the Dominican developed during the 13th century created a novel and rational system of internal government which was characterised, among other things, by original procedures and democratic elements. Many of them were at once adopted by other religious orders and had possibly an influence even outside the vita religiosa and the church. The paper will present and discuss the reality of a Dominican constitutional model in the Middle Ages.