IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1312: Monastic Architecture: Contradiction or Manifestation of Written and Unwritten Rules and Regulations

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG), Technische Universität, Dresden
Organisers:Kerstin Groer, Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG), Technische Universität Dresden
Sebastian J. Mickisch, Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG), Technische Universität Dresden
Moderator/Chair:Steven Vanderputten, Vakgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit Gent
Paper 1312-aCistercian Architecture as Reflection of the Conflict between Ideals, Rules, and Secular Involvement
(Language: English)
Kerstin Groer, Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG), Technische Universität Dresden
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Lay Piety, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 1312-bCamaldolese Settlements: Hermitages and Monasteries as Reflective of Conflicts between Different Projects of Religious Life
(Language: English)
Nicolangelo D'Acunto, Dipartimento di Studi Medievali, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Brescia
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 1312-cFranciscan Architecture: Violation of the Rule or Key to the Observance of the Original Mandatum
(Language: English)
Sebastian J. Mickisch, Forschungsstelle für Vergleichende Ordensgeschichte (FOVOG), Technische Universität Dresden
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Monasticism, Religious Life
Abstract

Paper -a:
When the first Cistercian monks left Molesme Abbey to live a stricter and purer monastic life, they chose a place that is described as heremus or vastus solitudo. This separation from the world, stricter observance of the rule, simplicitas and the idea of poverty were important Cistercian principles. Despite these ideals the abbeys were involved in worldly affairs because of external circumstances like economic success and relationships to fundatores. The paper seeks to provide examples of how the tension between inside and outside, ideal, rule, and secular involvement are reflected in the structure and symbolism of Cistercian architecture.

Paper -b:
The architectonic structure of Camaldoli (in Tuscany), which comprises a series of small, neighbouring hermitic cells and a monastery, reflects the ambivalence of a proposal of religious life that was characterised as early as the 12th century by the tension between hermitic vocation, considered an indispensable reserve of genuine spirituality, and the recurrent temptation to transform the entire congregation in a coenobitic sense.

Paper -c:
The duality of inside and outside, of contemplation and ‘proselytisation’ as it was adopted from the apostolic ideal of the New Testament has been the core of the Franciscan mandatum. However the purity of apostolic life was only to be accomplished by accepting and embracing evangelic poverty as it was defined in the Regula Bullata, Chapter 6: ‘Fratres nihil sibi approprient nec domum nec locum nec aliquam rem’. To what extent can the emergence of Franciscan Convents with their specific architecture be understood as a breaking or bending of the original rule or as a necessary adaption to assert the original mandatum?