IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1315: Unwritten Rules in Embroidery of the Early Medieval Period

Wednesday 11 July 2012, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:DISTAFF: Discussion, Interpretation & Study of Textile Arts, Fabrics & Fashions
Organiser:Alexandra M. Lester-Makin, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
Moderator/Chair:Gale R. Owen-Crocker, Department of English & American Studies, University of Manchester
Paper 1315-aHow to Become a Relic: An Embroidery's Guide
(Language: English)
Alexandra M. Lester-Makin, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Art History - Decorative Arts, Religious Life
Paper 1315-bEarly Woollen Castles
(Language: English)
Maggie Kneen, Department of History, University of Manchester
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Art History - Decorative Arts
Paper 1315-cReinventing the Rules: Slipping between the Bayeux Tapestry and Its Victorian Replica
(Language: English)
Anna C. Henderson, University of Exeter Press / University of Manchester
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Art History - Decorative Arts
Abstract

The three papers in this session explore the unwritten rules employed by embroiderers who created what have become monuments to the Early Medieval Period. One paper draws on a variety of evidence to demonstrate how unwritten rules led Anglo-Saxon embroideries, such as those at Durham and Maaseik, to become important secondary relics in themselves. Two papers investigate unwritten rules of the Bayeux Tapestry. The first examines the rules and templates used to create the Tapestry’s built environment. The second analyses how embedded rules were interpreted, or mis-interpreted, when the ladies of Leek recreated the embroidery some 800 years later.