IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1514: Normalizing Christianity: Christian Rules versus Pagan Practices in Medieval Slavic Traditions

Thursday 12 July 2012, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Departamento de Filología Griega y Lingüística Indoeuropea, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Organiser:Juan Antonio Álvarez-Pedrosa Núñez, Departamento de Filología Griega y Lingüística Indoeuropea, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Moderator/Chair:Svetlina Nikolova, Cyrillo Methodian Research Centre, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia
Paper 1514-aCondemning Magical (and Pagan) Practices in the Opatovice Homiliary
(Language: English)
Juan Antonio Álvarez-Pedrosa Núñez, Departamento de Filología Griega y Lingüística Indoeuropea, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Index terms: Language and Literature - Slavic, Pagan Religions
Paper 1514-bCondemning Magical (and Pagan) Practices in East Slavic Texts
(Language: English)
Enrique Santos Marinas, Departamento de Filología Griega y Lingüística Indoeuropea, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Index terms: Language and Literature - Slavic, Pagan Religions
Paper 1514-cConcepts of Justice, Lawfulness, and Lawlessness in the Slavic Versions of Menander Wisdom
(Language: English)
Patricia González Almarcha, Departamento de Filología Románica, Filología Eslava y Lingüística General, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Index terms: Language and Literature - Slavic, Pagan Religions
Abstract

The Christianization of the Slavs took place in a long period between the 8th and 12th centuries. It was a succession of forced conversions in a vertical direction from the ruling prince to his people. That is why many pagan practices survived long after the official baptism, especially in popular religion. Such practices are attested by the condemnation of different juridical and homiletic works, that have been gathered by Professor J. A. Álvarez-Pedrosa and his research group, and that will be surveyed in this session. Finally, we will show the adaptation of the Greek concepts of justice, lawfulness and lawlessness to Christian morality in the Slavonic versions of Menander’s wise sentences.