IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1622: The Angevins, I: Family, Benefaction, and Power

Thursday 12 July 2012, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:School of History, University of Glasgow
Organisers:Colette Marie Bowie, Independent Scholar, Glasgow
Paul Webster, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Moderator/Chair:Joanna Huntington, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Paper 1622-aA Tight-Fisted Patron?: Geoffrey, Count of Anjou and Duke of Normandy, 1129-51
(Language: English)
Kathryn Dutton, Department of History, University of Glasgow / School of History, University of Liverpool
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Charters and Diplomatics, Lay Piety, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1622-bMatilda of Saxony and the Cult of St Oswald at Hildesheim
(Language: English)
Colette Marie Bowie, Independent Scholar, Glasgow
Index terms: Lay Piety, Politics and Diplomacy, Religious Life, Women's Studies
Paper 1622-cFrom Conflict to Commemoration: King John's Family Piety
(Language: English)
Paul Webster, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Lay Piety, Religious Life
Abstract

The 12th-century transformation of the Angevins from counts to kings was accompanied by wide-ranging benefaction of churches and support for saints’ cults. This session explores the relationship between such activity and Angevin networks of power. Kathryn Dutton examines how and why comital religious patronage lessened in Anjou under Geoffrey V, and his attitudes towards Norman religious institutions. Colette Bowie focusses on Henry II’s daughter Matilda, duchess of Saxony, who promoted her royal lineage through support for the cult of St Oswald at Hildesheim, patronage bearing the hallmark of Anglo-Norman trends. Paul Webster shows how Anglo-Norman and Angevin family obligations inherited by King John shaped provision for his soul’s salvation.