IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 1719: 'Ruling' the Script, VI: Hebrew Scripts

Thursday 12 July 2012, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Eva Frojmovic, Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Leeds
Dominique Stutzmann, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Georg Vogeler, Zentrum für Informationsmodellierung in den Geisteswissenschaften, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Moderator/Chair:Eva Frojmovic, Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1719-a13th-Century Castilian in Hebrew Script: What Is the Rule?
(Language: English)
Javier del Barco, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Madrid
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Literacy and Orality, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1719-bMasters of Micrography in 13th-Century Ashkenaz
(Language: English)
Rahel Fronda, Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Literacy and Orality, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1719-cHebrew Riesenbibeln and the Kalonymos Family of Scribes
(Language: English)
Annette Weber, Lehrstuhl für Jüdische Kunst, Hochschule für Jüdische Studien, Heidelberg
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Literacy and Orality, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Abstract a: Aljamiado (the use of Arabic and Hebrew script to transcribe Romance languages) is one of the most salient manifestations of language contact among different religious communities in medieval Iberia. The use of the Arabic and Hebrew writing systems for Romance languages put the scribes’ writing habits to the test, and made them aware of the problem of correspondence between sounds and graphic signs. Hebrew aljamiado texts written between the 11th and the 15th century exhibit a transforming system in which neither specific rules nor univocal correspondences were formulated; nevertheless, some trends can be outlined and described as ‘rules’. In this paper I will analyze aljamiado glosses from a 13th-century biblical commentary in Hebrew, and will attempt to find these rules in the use of the graphic system, both in diachronic comparison with other aljamiado texts and in linguistic comparison with other graphic systems in use at the same time, namely Arabic and Latin.

Abstract b: This paper will present exemplary Masoretes, that is scribes who wrote ornamental copies of the micrographic Masorah magna in medieval Ashkenazi Bibles.

Abstract c: to be provided

Abstract d: to be provided