IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 320: Rules in Transformation: Saxon Law as Work in Progress

Monday 9 July 2012, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Mittelalterzentrum, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität, Freiburg
Organiser:Henrike Manuwald, Deutsches Seminar - Germanistische Mediävistik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Moderator/Chair:Maike Huneke, Institut für Rechtsgeschichte, Germanistische Abteilung, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Paper 320-aTransformation of Vernacular Medieval Law in the Gloss on the Sachsenspiegel: The Example of Truth on Trial
(Language: English)
Bernd Kannowski, Institut für Rechtsgeschichte und geschichtliche Rechtsvergleichung, Germanistische Abteilung, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index terms: Law, Literacy and Orality, Philosophy, Theology
Paper 320-bInnovation Justified by Rhetorical Tradition: The Prologue of the Gloss on the Sachsenspiegel
(Language: English)
Henrike Manuwald, Deutsches Seminar - Germanistische Mediävistik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index terms: Language and Literature - German, Law, Rhetoric
Paper 320-cHow to Act in Court: Transformations from Law Book to Instruction Book in the Richtsteig and Corresponding Texts
(Language: English)
Kristina Odenweller, Deutsches Seminar - Germanistische Mediävistik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index terms: Language and Literature - German, Law, Literacy and Orality
Abstract

The Sachsenspiegel, as the first and most significant codification of German customary law in writing (c. 1230), was followed by a number of modifications in the 14th century. This session addresses the techniques and aims of these transformations, such as: adaptation of content; new forms of legitimization including the use of scientific methods; recourse to traditional literary forms of prayer-prologues as a means of legitimizing modernisation; adaptation to actual use e.g. by normative prescriptions of procedures including oral formulas. These modifications are shown to be paradigmatic of an affirmative and simultaneously modernizing treatment of rules, and also of the transition from an oral to a literate culture.