IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 520: The Rules for Archbishops of Canterbury, 1070-1170

Tuesday 10 July 2012, 09.00-10.30

Organiser:Sally N. Vaughn, Department of History, University of Houston, Texas
Moderator/Chair:Jay Diehl, Department of History, Long Island University, New York
Paper 520-aLanfranc and Anselm: Making the Rules
(Language: English)
Sally N. Vaughn, Department of History, University of Houston, Texas
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Mentalities, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 520-bRalph d'Escures, William of Corbeil, and Theobald of Bec: Following the Rules
(Language: English)
Jean A. Truax, Texas Medieval Association, Houston
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Mentalities, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 520-cBecket: Breaking the Rules?
(Language: English)
Anne J. Duggan, Department of History, King's College London
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Mentalities, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

Archbishops Lanfranc (1070-89) and Anselm (1093-1109) of Canterbury initiated a new phase in England’s church as successive archbishops after the Norman Conquest, setting a pattern for ideal ‘right order’ for Canterbury. Anselm’s astute handling of the English Investiture Controversy spared England the trauma of the German controversy, and established a model for his successors Ralph d’Escures, William of Corbeil, and Theobald, who applied Anselm’s lessons to their interactions with king and pope over Canterbury’s primacy in England: the king’s authority and personal relationship with his archbishop. In turn, did Becket likewise strive to follow Anselm’s model, with disastrous, unforeseen results?