IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 529: From Infamous Queens to Spectacular Countesses: Ruling Women in Medieval Italy (9th - 12th Centuries)

Tuesday 10 July 2012, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Organiser:Roberta Cimino, Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews / Università di Bologna
Moderator/Chair:Edward Coleman, Department of History,
Paper 529-a'Dilectissima coniunx et consors regni': Expressions of Queenship in Italian Diplomas (9th – 10th Centuries)
(Language: English)
Roberta Cimino, Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews / Università di Bologna
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Politics and Diplomacy, Women's Studies
Paper 529-bBefore Matilde: Beatrice of Lorena 'Dux et Marchio Tusciae'
(Language: English)
Tiziana Lazzari, Dipartimento di Paleografia e Medievistica, Università di Bologna
Index terms: Politics and Diplomacy, Women's Studies
Paper 529-cHow the Grand Countess Matilda of Tuscany Replaced the Rules of the Salian King Henry IV with Her Own
(Language: English)
Penelope Joan Nash, School of Philosophical & Historical Inquiry, University of Sydney
Index terms: Politics and Diplomacy, Women's Studies
Abstract

This session aims to analyze women’s influence in Italian politics from the dissolution of the Carolingian empire to the birth of Italian communes. Each of the papers explores an example of the way in which royal and noble women were capable of exercising power in different political contexts. 9th and 10th-century royal charters demonstrate that Italian queens successfully contributed to the shaping of royal family politics. During the 11th century, the marchioness Beatrice of Lorena, after the death of her first husband Boniface of Canossa, was left in control of the March of Tuscany. Her daughter Matilda inherited her family’s possessions which she kept under her firm control until her death in 1115.