IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 609: Visions of Community, II: Empire after Empire

Tuesday 10 July 2012, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Sonderforschungsbereich 'Visions of Community', Österreichischer Fonds zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung / Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Institut für Geschichte, Universität Wien
Organiser:Rutger Kramer, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Mayke de Jong, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper 609-a'Imperial' Relics in 6th-Century Gaul
(Language: English)
Stefan Esders, Geschichte der Spätantike und des frühen Mittelalters, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Hagiography, Political Thought, Religious Life
Paper 609-bExegesis after Empire: Christian Universalism and Particular Identities in Latin Biblical Commentary
(Language: English)
Gerda Heydemann, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Institut für Geschichte, Universität Wien
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Political Thought, Theology
Paper 609-cLateran Thinking: The Idea of Rome and the Carolingian Church Reforms
(Language: English)
Rutger Kramer, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Mentalities, Monasticism, Political Thought
Abstract

When empires decline or fall, the frame of reference of a ‘larger social whole’ collapses. Particular communities and identities emerge, which attract loyalties previously focused on an empire. How are larger and more inclusive visions of community maintained or reconstructed? This session seeks to address such shifts in the frame of reference of people living in the context of a Roman empire that had all but disappeared from Western Europe. First, Stefan Esders will analyse the political and religious dynamics between Byzantium and Merovingian France as seen through the relic transfers described in Gregory of Tours’ De Gloria Martyrum. Then, Gerda Heydemann will sketch the development of the notion of ecclesia gentium in biblical commentaries between the 6th and 9th centuries, in a paper which seeks to explore how the particular micro-christendoms that developed in the post-Roman kingdoms, came to structure and define Christianity, instead of the former imperial political framework. Finally, Rutger Kramer will attempt to shed light on the role of Rome as an ideal and a driving force behind the Carolingian church reforms – which were, after all, partially intended to restructure the imperial framework fragmented in the preceding centuries.