IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 618: Writing and Rewriting History in Conquest England

Tuesday 10 July 2012, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Battle Conference on Anglo-Norman Studies / Haskins Society for Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Norman, Angevin & Viking History
Organiser:Chris Lewis, Department of History, King's College London / Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Chris Lewis, Department of History, King's College London / Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Paper 618-aThe Notion of Treachery in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle during Æthelred's Reign
(Language: English)
Courtnay Konshuh, Department of History, University of Winchester
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Old English, Political Thought
Paper 618-bWomen in the D Chronicle: Writing and Rewriting the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles
(Language: English)
Pauline Stafford, School of History, University of Liverpool / Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Old English, Politics and Diplomacy, Women's Studies
Paper 618-c'Saint lignage': Hagiography and Norman Genealogy in 12th-Century England
(Language: English)
Ilya Afanasyev, Hertford College, University of Oxford / University of Miam
Index terms: Hagiography, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin, Political Thought
Abstract

This session is concerned with the ways in which calamatious events in the history of England over the course of the long 11th century prompted changing responses among contemporary observers and later historians. The first two papers assess the rewriting of history in the vernacular Anglo-Saxon chronicles: how treachery was inscribed in the hindsight-driven account of Æthelred II’s reign, and how the role of women in the political life of the kingdom was subjected to constant re-evaluation over time. The third paper deals with how historiographers of the earlier 12th century created a new image of the Norman ducal line, quite different from earlier representations.