IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 709: Visions of Community, III: Negotiating Empire in the Ninth Century

Tuesday 10 July 2012, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Sonderforschungsbereich 'Visions of Community', Österreichischer Fonds zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung / Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Institut für Geschichte, Universität Wien
Organiser:Rutger Kramer, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Steffen Patzold, Abteilung für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard Karls Universität, Tübingen
Paper 709-aPreaching Unity/Diversity
(Language: English)
Maximilian Diesenberger, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Political Thought, Religious Life, Sermons and Preaching, Theology
Paper 709-bDial D for Debate: Religious Controversies and Social Concerns in the 9th Century
(Language: English)
Irene van Renswoude, Huygens Instituut voor Nederlandse Geschiedenis, Koninklijke Nederlandse Academie van Wetenschappen, Den Haag
Index terms: Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Rhetoric
Paper 709-cImperial Reflections in Alemannic Formularies
(Language: English)
Bernhard Zeller, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Monasticism, Political Thought
Abstract

This session will focus on strategies employed by individual communities in the Carolingian realms to incorporate the influence of an overarching empire in their social realities, and to adapt to its effects on the formation of their own identity. To that effect, Maximilian Diesenberger will first look at a number of sermons from different parts of the realms, analysing and interpreting various strategies of audience inclusion across time and space. Remaining in Alemannia, Bernhard Zeller will take a closer look at some of the formularies stemming from that region; apart from their primary function as collections of model texts, these sources also functioned as repositories of the past, and repertories for an (imperial) future.