IMC 2012: Sessions

Session 819: The Rules for Reading and Depicting History in Paolino da Venezia's Chronologia Magna and Its Occitan Translation

Tuesday 10 July 2012, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading / Leverhulme Trust
Organiser:Catherine E. Léglu, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Moderator/Chair:Catherine E. Léglu, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Paper 819-aImages of the Pagan Gods in the Abreujamens de las Estorias: History and Allegory
(Language: English)
Federico Botana, Department of Modern Languages & European Studies, University of Reading
Index terms: Art History - General, Education, Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 819-bSelected Problems of Transcription and Editorial Practice in the Abreujamens de las Estorias by Paulinus of Venice (BL, Egerton 1500)
(Language: English)
Alexander Ibarz, Department of Modern Languages & European Studies, University of Reading
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Genealogy and Prosopography, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - French or Occitan
Paper 819-cLa tradition latine de la Chronologia magna
(Language: Français)
Isabelle Heullant-Donat, Département d'histoire, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

This session explores a universal history of the early 14th century that is structured as a series of illustrated genealogies and lines of succession, creating a kind of medieval hypertext. The manuscript tradition of Paolino da Venezia’s Chronologia magna shows his successive attempts to create and apply rules (both structural and iconographic) for narrating the passage of time, variously for his fellow Franciscans, Pope John XXII, and King Robert of Naples. This forms part of a Leverhulme Trust-funded edition of the Occitan translation of the Chronologia magna, London BL Egerton 1500. Work on the translation raises further questions about readership, patronage, and the transmission of knowledge.