IMC 2013: Sessions

Session 1030: Digital Pleasures, IV: Scholarly Editions, Data Formats, Data Exploitation

Wednesday 3 July 2013, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Groupement de Recherche 'Diplomatique' (GDR 3177-CNRS) / Association Paléographique Internationale, Culture, Ecriture, Société / Cap Digital
Organiser:Dominique Stutzmann, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Moderator/Chair:Sébastien Barret, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Paper 1030-aDatabases versus Encoding: Which Methods for Which Results?
(Language: English)
Francesco Stella, Dipartimento di teoria e documentazione delle tradizioni culturali, Università di Siena
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1030-bDetecting Contaminations in a Textual Tradition: Computer versus Traditional Methods
(Language: English)
Jean-Baptiste Camps, Université Paris IV - Sorbonne
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Computing in Medieval Studies, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1030-cText Encoding and Annotation Formats in the BFM Old French Corpus
(Language: English)
Alexey Lavrentev, École Normale Supérieure Lettres et Sciences Humaines, Lyon
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Between the documents and the published results of historical research, there are several steps, in which the textual edition may (or may not) be involved. Historians have to define and constitute their ‘sources’ as such, and the process of analysis is divided in multiple stages. The first analysis is done in encoding and formatting the data (e.g.reading, understanding and expanding abbreviations, identifying persons and places); a second step may intervene in submitting this data to different sorts of transformations or (semi-) automatized analysis, whose results still have to be (humanly) interpreted. This session will explore the links between data formats, data exploitation, tools, and results of historical research.