IMC 2013: Sessions

Session 206: Political Networks and Landscapes in the Late Middle Ages: Southern Germany and the Swiss Confederation

Monday 1 July 2013, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Lehrstuhl für Bayerische und Fränkische Landesgeschichte, Department Geschichte, Friedrich-Alexsander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
Organiser:Hiromi Abe, Lehrstuhl für Bayerische und Fränkische Landesgeschichte, Department Geschichte, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
Moderator/Chair:Len Scales, Department of History, Durham University
Paper 206-aDaily 'Diplomacy' in Franconia: Letters and Diplomats of the Municipal Council of Nuremberg in the 15th Century
(Language: English)
Hiromi Abe, Lehrstuhl für Bayerische und Fränkische Landesgeschichte, Department Geschichte, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
Index terms: Local History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 206-bLateral Political Relationships on the Upper Rhine during the Reign of Sigismund of Luxemburg (1411-1437)
(Language: English)
Duncan Hardy, Jesus College, University of Oxford
Index terms: Law, Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 206-cThe Political Network of the Late Medieval Swiss Confederation during the Era of the Struggle for Independence
(Language: English)
Aya Muramatsu, Historisches Institut, Universität Bern
Index terms: Local History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

Political life in the late medieval Holy Roman Empire was characterised by a wide variety of actors and jurisdictional fragmentation. The monarch, princes, bishops, nobles, and cities all exercised political authority to some degree, and were in constant interaction with one another, often forming formal political associations. This situation raises important questions about the nature and development of politics there. This session examines networks and relationships between political actors through three regional case studies: Franconia, the Upper Rhine, and Switzerland. It aims both to uncover regional peculiarities and to identify common themes in late medieval Imperial and European history.