IMC 2013: Sessions

Session 212: The Pleasure and Pragmatics of Epistolary Exchange, I: Love, Friendship, and the Art of Letter Writing

Monday 1 July 2013, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Prato Consortium for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Organisers:Diana Marie Jeske, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Sita Steckel, Historisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Moderator/Chair:Sita Steckel, Historisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Paper 212-aWriting to Friends and Enemies: Alcuin’s Letters and the Carolingian Salutatio
(Language: English)
Laura Carlson, Department of History, Queen's University, Ontario
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Rhetoric, Theology
Paper 212-bLiterary Play and Epistolary Flexibility: Letters of Love and Friendship in the 11th and 12th Centuries
(Language: English)
Diana Marie Jeske, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index terms: Gender Studies, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Women's Studies
Paper 212-cClassicizing Form, Classicizing Friendship: Petrarch and the Ars Dictaminis
(Language: English)
Anna Wilson, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, Downtown
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Rhetoric
Abstract

The pleasure of corresponding with friends and colleagues is a strong feature of letter writing across the medieval period. This session aims to explore the specific relationship between concepts of good letter writing practice and their execution in real letters exchanged between friends and colleagues (as opposed to letters of patronage, business or diplomacy). Our first paper will examine the connection between Alcuin’s reliance on works of classical rhetoric, and his epistolary style in letters to colleagues on the topic of Adoptionism, a subject which has been understudied in the past. Our second paper will examine the relationship between a flexible epistolary form in the 11th and 12th centuries and the highly literary correspondence between men and women on the subject of love and friendship. Our final paper will explore the connection between Petrarch’s deliberate attempts to break with medieval epistolary practice (and return to a classical ideal), and his cultivation, through the exchange of classicized letters, of a circle of intellectual, literary friends.