IMC 2013: Sessions

Session 613: Pleasurable Peregrinations: Re-Creations of the Holy Land in the Later Middle Ages

Tuesday 2 July 2013, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:AHRC Network 'Remembered Places and Invented Traditions: Thinking about the Holy Land in the Late Medieval West', Birkbeck, University of London
Organiser:Marianne O'Doherty, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Sarah Salih, Department of English Language & Literature, King's College London
Paper 613-aIntroduction: 'plusours gentz se delitent en oier parler de la dite seinte terre et en ount solaz' (Mandeville)
(Language: English)
Marianne O'Doherty, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Middle English, Lay Piety, Religious Life
Paper 613-bA Pleasurable Pilgrimage in Gerald of Wales's Itinerarium Kambriae
(Language: English)
Natalia Petrovskaia, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Crusades, Language and Literature - Latin, Lay Piety
Paper 613-cThe Pilgrim's Library: William Wey and Sir John Mandeville
(Language: English)
Anthony Bale, Department of English & Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Language and Literature - Middle English, Religious Life
Abstract

Emerging from the AHRC Network, ‘Remembered Places, Invented Traditions: Thinking about the Holy Land in the Late Middle Ages’, the papers in this session consider the dimensions of ‘pleasure’ in strikingly different re-creations of the Holy Land and/or pilgrimage experience. O’Doherty’s paper will offer a brief contextual and conceptual introduction, and a consideration of pleasure as a concept that both links and distances past and present. Petrovskaia’s paper discusses the pleasures of simulated pilgrimage in the 12th-century Welsh countryside. Bale’s paper will consider William Wey’s 15th-century itineraries in the light of his borrowing from Mandeville‚Äôs Book of Marvels and Travels, exploring the pleasures of reading, rather than travelling, as articulated by Wey.