IMC 2013: Sessions

Session 628: Full Stomachs and Belly-Aches: Food in Late Medieval Culture and Medicine

Tuesday 2 July 2013, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Bartholomeus Society for Medieval Studies
Organiser:Geert van Iersel, Bartholomeus Society / Fontys Hogescholen, Tilburg
Moderator/Chair:Rob Meens, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper 628-aNutrition and the Body's Inner Core in Late Medieval University Medicine
(Language: English)
Karine van 't Land, Independent Scholar, Eindhoven
Index terms: Medicine, Mentalities, Science
Paper 628-bRecontextualising the Food and Drink in The Squire of Low Degree
(Language: English)
Geert van Iersel, Bartholomeus Society / Fontys Hogescholen, Tilburg
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Mentalities, Social History
Paper 628-cA Delectable Pig's Head from Amsterdam
(Language: English)
Bas Jongenelen, Fontys Hogescholen, Tilburg
Index terms: Language and Literature - Dutch, Mentalities
Paper 628-d'He that is well, he does not flee': Text and Context in the Old French Fabliau de Cocagne, c. 1250
(Language: English)
Ben Parsons, School of English, University of Leicester
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan
Abstract

This session looks at the role of food in two literary compositions and in later medieval medical discourse. Karine van ‘t Land, an historian and medical practicioner, will be looking at the conception of food as a replenisher and potential modifier of bodily matter. Geert van Iersel, who specialises in interpreting literary texts from their ideological and economic contexts, will be looking at the investments and activities that would have been required for serving the food and drink mentioned in The Squire of Low Degree. Bas Jongenelen, who works primarily on popular literature in the Low Countries, will interpret a passage from the Amsterdam contribution to the 1561 Rotterdam literature festival which seemingly calls for the inordinate consumption of food and drink. Ben Parsons, who specialises in medieval comedy and satire, will be looking into the cultural significance of The Land of Cockaigne.