IMC 2013: Sessions

Session 808: Byzantium in Context, IV: Networks, Complexities and Communications in the (Early) Medieval World

Tuesday 2 July 2013, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Institute of Historical Research, Department of Byzantine Research, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens
Organiser:Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Ekaterini Mitsiou, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Department of Byzantine Research, National Hellenic Research Foundation (NHRF), Athens
Paper 808-aUnited in Trust: Telic Distribution, Anti-Relic Sentiments and Ecclesiastical Networks in Gaul, 4th-5th Century
(Language: English)
David Natal Villazala, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Language and Literature - Latin, Monasticism, Social History
Paper 808-bCaught in Charlemagne's Net: Carolingian Charters and Social Network Analysis
(Language: English)
Rachel Stone, Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge / Department of History, King's College London
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Social History
Paper 808-cMedieval Entanglements: Trans-Border Networks in Byzantium and China in Comparison, c. 300-900
(Language: English)
Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Social History
Abstract

In the last decades, tools and concepts of network analysis have been applied to various topics of medieval history. In this session, the potential, problems and explanatory value of some of the most recent applications of computer-based historical network analysis will be demonstrated for three cases from the Late Antique and Medieval World. The three presentations will highlight social as well as geographical entanglements across larger regions and their actual complexity, also in a comparative perspective.