IMC 2013: Sessions

Session 819: Pain, Profit, and a Little Pleasure in Medieval Scandinavia, II

Tuesday 2 July 2013, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Creating the New North Research Programme, Universitetet i Tromsø
Organiser:Richard Holt, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Moderator/Chair:Richard Holt, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Paper 819-aBusiness or Just for the Hell of It?: Late Medieval Warfare along the Northern Coast and in the White Sea
(Language: English)
Stefan Figenschow, Department of Archaeology, History, Religious Studies and Theology, The Arctic University of Tromsø
Index terms: Crusades, Economics - Trade, Geography and Settlement Studies, Military History
Paper 819-bTrade and Taxation in the North: What Actually Were They Fighting Over?
(Language: English)
Lars Ivar Hansen, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Index terms: Economics - General, Economics - Trade, Geography and Settlement Studies, Social History
Paper 819-cThe Myth of the Danish Baltic Empire: The Capture and Humiliation of Valdemar 'the Victorious' by a Discontented Danish Vassal
(Language: English)
Kerstin Hundahl, Historiska Institutionen, Lunds Universitet
Index terms: Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The three papers present different but linked aspects of medieval Scandinavia. The northern areas were rich in luxury furs and eiderdown which were exported to meet a constant demand from the wealthy of Europe. Coastal areas produced fish, and the 14th and 15th centuries saw a pattern of raiding along the northern coast of Fennoscandia apparently aimed at control of valuable resources – although the motivation for warfare and raiding is often unclear. The ambitions of the Danish kings and aristocracy for the most part aimed at control of the resources of the Baltic Sea region.