IMC 2013: Sessions

Session 824: The Growth of Religious Reform Movements in Late Medieval Central and Eastern Europe: Contexts and Comparisons

Tuesday 2 July 2013, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:School of Slavonic & East European Studies, University College London / Institut für Realienkunde des Mittelalters & der frühen Neuzeit, Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalterstudien (IZMS), Universität Salzburg
Organisers:Kateřina Horníčková, Institut für Realienkunde des Mittelalters & der frühen Neuzeit, Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalterstudien (IZMS), Universität Salzburg
Eleanor Janega, School of Slavonic & East European Studies, University College London
Moderator/Chair:Pavlína Rychterová, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 824-aThe Church of Prague in the Last Days: Eschatological Reform Preaching in 14th-Century Bohemia
(Language: English)
Eleanor Janega, School of Slavonic & East European Studies, University College London
Index terms: Religious Life, Sermons and Preaching
Paper 824-bReform in the Vernacular: John Hus and the University
(Language: English)
Marcela K. Perett, European College of Liberal Arts (ECLA), Bard College, Berlin
Index terms: Religious Life, Sermons and Preaching
Paper 824-cA Conflict of Reformers?: The Hussite and the Conciliarist Concept of Church Reform
(Language: English)
Pavel Soukup, Department of History, University College London
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Religious Life
Abstract

The session deals with the formation, development, and spreading (e.g. preaching, texts and their circulation, religious practices) of religious reform movement in the Kingdoms of Bohemia and Poland in the late 14th and early 15th centuries. It looks in particular at the presence (or absence) of religious reform thinking in late medieval Bohemian and Polish society, while the session also aims at making comparisons within the region. The development of reform movements in Central Europe is comprised of a spectrum of diverse phenomena, ranging from reform preaching, the spread of devotional practices, and the growth in lay participation, to the development of reformist thought, theology, and politics, all of which could, in extreme cases, lead to religious wars. Whilst taking into account specific territorial phenomena, this session promotes a regional perspective by comparing developments in late medieval Central-European religion and society and, ultimately, placing them in the broader European context.