IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1003: Petrification Processes: Artefacts, Architecture, and Afterlife

Wednesday 8 July 2015, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:McCord Centre for Historic & Cultural Landscape, Newcastle University
Organiser:Sophie Hueglin, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, Newcastle University
Moderator/Chair:Victoria Whitworth, Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands & Islands, Orkney
Paper 1003-aParcels and Possession, Petrification and Permanence
(Language: English)
Sam Turner, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, Newcastle University
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Archaeology - Sites, Architecture - Religious
Paper 1003-bMaterials and Methods, Movements, and Motivations
(Language: English)
Sophie Hueglin, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, Newcastle University
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - Sites, Architecture - Religious, Architecture - Secular
Paper 1003-cGraves and Go(o)ds, Generations, and Genealogy
(Language: English)
Andreas Haasis-Berner, Archäologische Denkmalpflege, Regierungspräsidium Freiburg
Ulrike Scholz, Independent Scholar, Regensberg
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Archaeology - Sites, Architecture - General
Abstract

‘Petrification’ can be understood as a process of change whose effect (whether intended or not) was to make something more permanent, trans-generational, or even eternal. Deliberate reforms and renewals like the change from wood to stone in early medieval architecture were literally a kind of petrification, but societies might consequently have been ‘petrified’ in a more profound way. The resulting material remains can be interpreted by medieval archaeologists: the papers in this session attempt to investigate and explain some examples of such transformations.