IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1018: Constructing Cultural Identities: Mendicant Houses, Power, and Renovatio Urbis, 13th-14th Centuries

Wednesday 8 July 2015, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Dipartimento di Italianistica, Romanistica, Antichistica, Arti e Spettacolo (DIRAAS), Università degli Studi di Genova
Organisers:Cristiana Di Cerbo, Dipartimento di Italianistica, Romanistica, Antichistica, Arti e Spettacolo (DIRAAS), Università degli Studi di Genova
Andrea Pala, Dipartimento di Storia, Beni Culturali e Territorio, Università degli Studi di Cagliari
Moderator/Chair:Fulvio Cervini, Dipartimento di Storia, Archeologia, Geografia, Arte e Spettacolo (SAGAS), Università degli Studi di Firenze
Paper 1018-aThe Marketplace and the Miraculous Madonna: The Medieval Carmelites and Cultural Exchange in Naples
(Language: English)
Alexandra Dodson, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, Duke University, North Carolina
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 1018-bNew Buildings in an Old City of the Angevin Kingdom: The Nolan Renovatio and the Orsini Family during the 14th Century
(Language: Italiano)
Cristiana Di Cerbo, Dipartimento di Italianistica, Romanistica, Antichistica, Arti e Spettacolo (DIRAAS), Università degli Studi di Genova
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - Painting, Heraldry, Monasticism
Paper 1018-cPolitical Power, Mendicant Art, and Architecture in Sardinia during the 13th and 14th Centuries
(Language: Italiano)
Andrea Pala, Dipartimento di Storia, Beni Culturali e Territorio, Università degli Studi di Cagliari
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - Sculpture, Monasticism
Abstract

Mendicant architecture was characterized by indisputable volumetric and ornamental variety due to two factors: the integration of local building traditions, and the participation of laity in church construction and decoration. This session proposes an investigation of the processes of renovatio urbis to examine the mendicants’ impact on topographical and socio-devotional urban development, and on modalities of construction and expressions of cultural identity by religious and lay populations. In particular, the study of the Angevin Kingdom of Naples and the relationships between the Sardinian kingdoms with the crown of Aragon and the maritime republics will permit us to consider two primary issues. First, the local communities’ reception of new, exotic styles and ideological propaganda ‘imported’ by dominant groups, and second, the communities’ rejection of those elements in favor of autochthonous traditions.