IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1026: The Transformation of the Carolingian World, I

Wednesday 8 July 2015, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Organiser:Maximilian Diesenberger, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Maximilian Diesenberger, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 1026-aOttonian Capitularies
(Language: English)
Steffen Patzold, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Law, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1026-bInauguration Rituals and the History of Ottonian Queenship
(Language: English)
Simon MacLean, Department of History, Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Law, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1026-cThe Day After: Writing the Last St Gall Charters, c. 920-980
(Language: English)
Bernhard Zeller, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Law, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Abstract

The transformation of the Carolingian world at the end of the 9th and in the 10th centuries was accompanied by various challenges and difficulties such as the decline of the royal position of power, the hard-fought emergence of new, regional lordship, the invasions by external enemies and finally, political and social instability and disintegration. Already contemporaries like Regino of Prum, but also many modern scholars, regarded the deposition and death of Charles III in 887/888 after which the Empire fell apart and splintered into several separate successor kingdoms as the beginning of a period of crisis.

These sessions deal with this very period of transition from the Carolingian to the post-Carolingian period. They focus on historiography, social and legal practices as well as on their respective documents (councils, capitularia, charters) and tries to track their development from the 9th to the 10th century.