IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1040: The Past in Royal Discourse in Portugal, 12th-14th Centuries: From Royal Chancery to Royal Enquiries

Wednesday 8 July 2015, 09.00-10.30

Organiser:Maria João Branco, Departamento de História, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais & Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Moderator/Chair:Flocel Sabaté Curull, Grup de Recerca Consolidat en Estudis Medievals 'Espai, poder I cultura', Universitat de Lleida
Paper 1040-aThe Use of the Past in the Royal Chancery: Documents and Politics
(Language: English)
Hermínia Maria Vasconcelos Vilar, Centro Interdisciplinar de História, Culturas e Sociedades, Universidade de Évora
Hermenegildo Fernandes, Departamento da História, Universidade de Lisboa
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 1040-bThe Memory of Kings Gone by in the General Enquiries of 1222/1258
(Language: English)
Maria João Branco, Departamento de História, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais & Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 1040-cThe Preservation of Ancient Documents during the Middle Ages: The Case of the Transmission and Use of the Royal Enquiries
(Language: English)
Amélia Aguiar Andrade, Departamento de História, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais & Humanas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval
Abstract

The uses of the Past in the Middle Ages are manifold. In this session we intend to look at the evidence derived from the royal court and its documentary evidence, in order to assess the mechanisms used and the reflections of a royal discourse on populations not yet too used to the dominion of the new rulers of the also novel Kingdom of Portugal (1128-1258). We therefore plan to analyze the ways in which the past is used and dealt with in documents issued by the royal chancery and in the forms through which central polities are administered. In that same line, a second paper aims at analyzing another sort of ‘royal document’, the general enquiries of 1220 and 1258, in which a collection of witnesses’ statements give credit to the oral tradition and transmission of the image of royal presence, action and eloquence in the King’s realm. Finally, still within the documents produced in the chancery, we will look at the way in which the Royal Archive was organized and preserved, taking as sample the tradition of the transmission of the royal enquiries during the Middle Ages.