IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1205: Mapping Medieval Conflicts: Digital Approaches towards Political Dynamics in the Middle Ages

Wednesday 8 July 2015, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Organiser:Günter Katzler, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Abteilung Byzanzforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 1205-aOpenATLAS: An Open Source Tool for Mapping Historical Relations
(Language: English)
Stefan Eichert, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Computing in Medieval Studies, Geography and Settlement Studies, Technology
Paper 1205-bMapping the Competition: Bavarian Bishoprics in Carolingian Times
(Language: English)
Katharina Winckler, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Geography and Settlement Studies
Paper 1205-cCoalitions in the War of Emperor Sigismund against Duke Frederick IV of Tyrol
(Language: English)
Günter Katzler, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The new project ‘Mapping Medieval Conflicts’ (MEDCON) at the Institute for Medieval Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences aims at an evaluation and further development of tools of data organisation as well as social and geographical network analysis for the survey, visualisation, and analysis of conflict in medieval societies. In this session, the technological and methodological basis will be presented and discussed in comparison with other digital and quantitative approaches towards similar phenomena. Actual examples will focus on the Central Europe from the Carolingian period to the 13th century and demonstrate the explanatory power as well as the limits and pitfalls of network analytical and digital tools for the study of medieval politics.