IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 121: Memory, Identity, and Renewal in the Late Middle Ages: The Franciscans of Mount Zion in Jerusalem and the Representation of the Holy Land, 14th-16th Centuries

Monday 6 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NOW)
Organiser:Michele Campopiano, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York / Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Moderator/Chair:Jan Vandeburie, Warburg Institute, University of London
Paper 121-aCultural Memory and Cultural Identities in the Late Middle Ages: Franciscan Descriptions of the Holy Land between Historiography, Ethnography, Geography, and Cosmography, c. 1300-1530
(Language: English)
Michele Campopiano, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York / Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life, Science
Paper 121-bCustodians of Sacred Space: Franciscan Views on the Sacred Geography of the Holy Land from c. 1480 Onwards
(Language: English)
Marianne Ritsema van Eck, Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Index terms: Art History - General, Religious Life, Science, Theology
Paper 121-cInteracting with the 'Other' in Ritual: Franciscans and 'Syrians'/'Jacobites' at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre
(Language: English)
Valentina Covaci, Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Index terms: Anthropology, Liturgy, Religious Life, Theology
Abstract

Between 14th and 16th centuries the representation of the Holy Land in Western Europe was largely shaped by the Franciscans of the Convent of Mount Zion in Jerusalem. This session will investigate how they reformed and renewed the cultural memory of the holy places and the representation of Holy Land in the Medieval West. It will address the construction of sacred geographies by the Franciscans, their reproduction through topographical treatises and spatially-realised sacred geographies like the Italian sacri monti, their interaction with other religious communities through rituals performed in the holy places, and their descriptions of these very communities.