IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1238: Power Elites in the Later Middle Ages, III: Comparing the Impact of the Princely State on the Urban Elites of Castile, Nuremberg, and Ghent

Wednesday 8 July 2015, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:FWO - Research Foundation Flanders
Organiser:Jelten Baguet, Historisch Onderzoek naar Stedelijke Transformatieprocessen, Vrije Universiteit Brussel / Vakgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit Gent
Moderator/Chair:Laura Crombie, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Paper 1238-aRoyal Representatives under Local Elites' Control: Reshaping the Relations between State and Urban Population in Late Medieval Castile
(Language: English)
María de los Ángeles Martín Romera, Historisches Seminar, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Index terms: Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Social History
Paper 1238-bThe German Princely State as a Factor in Relations between Urban and Rural Elites: The Case of Nuremberg and Margrave Albrecht Achilles
(Language: English)
Ben Pope, Department of History, Durham University
Index terms: Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1238-cFrom Rebellious Aldermen to Docile Princely Servants?: Ghent's Urban Political Elite as Habsburg Officials in the Late 15th-16th Centuries
(Language: English)
Jelten Baguet, Historisch Onderzoek naar Stedelijke Transformatieprocessen, Vrije Universiteit Brussel / Vakgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit Gent
Index terms: Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Abstract

As princely states of late medieval Western Europe aspired to strengthen their authority over cities and towns they further reshaped patterns of interaction between city, state and nobility. In this session, this changing relationship is explored for the highly urbanized regions of Flanders, Southern Germany and Castile. This session will identify contrasts and similarities between the different trajectories of interaction between cities, states and nobles. On the one hand, there are the cases of Ghent and the Castilian cities, which were both confronted with the increasing presence of civil servants loyal to the princely state, and on the other hand there is the case of Nuremberg, where efforts by neighbouring princes to consolidate their territories led to a changing interaction between the city’s rulers and the rural nobility.