IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1239: Conquest, Conscience, Compilation: Writing Eminent Individuals into Histories of Mongol ‎Dynasties‎

Wednesday 8 July 2015, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:European Research Council Project 'Mobility, Empire & Cross-Cultural Contacts in Mongol Eurasia', Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Organisers:Francesca Fiaschetti, European Research Council Project 'Mobility, Empire & Cross-Cultural Contacts in Mongol Eurasia', Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Daniel Zakrzewski, Orientalisches Institut, Martin-Luther-Universität, Halle-Wittenberg / European Research Council Project 'Mobility, Empire & Cross-Cultural Contacts in Mongol Eurasia', Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Moderator/Chair:Naomi Standen, Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages (CeSMA), University of Birmingham
Paper 1239-aMongol Heroes and Perilous Seas: The Rhetoric of Legitimate War in the Yuanshi
(Language: English)
Francesca Fiaschetti, European Research Council Project 'Mobility, Empire & Cross-Cultural Contacts in Mongol Eurasia', Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1239-b(Re-)Writing Life Stories: A Stylometric Comparison of Biographies from the Yuan Dynasty
(Language: English)
Florence Hodous, European Research Council Project 'Mobility, Empire & Cross-Cultural Contacts in Mongol Eurasia', Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography
Paper 1239-c‎'Following the Policies of a Conquered Dynasty?': Humanitarian Interventions, Frustrated Ideals, ‎and Moral Decline in a Yuanshi Biography ‎
(Language: English)
Geoffrey Humble, School of History & Cultures, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Historiography - Medieval
Abstract

‎The papers of this session analyze portrayals of more or less prominent individuals in different contexts of Mongol imperial history, discussing questions of sources for and changes in historiographical works especially in Chinese. Taken, in the main, from the dynastic history of the Mongol rulers of China, these portrayals reveal the development of political ideals, notions of legitimacy, and views of their own past among the compilers of that dynastic history. While each paper will focus on a particular historical moment and one or more specific individuals, they ultimately address broader processes affecting perceptions across these broad areas.