IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1330: Renewing Bellicosity?: Masculinity between the Love for Enemies and Bloodlust in the Name of Christ

Wednesday 8 July 2015, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalterstudien (IZMS), Universität Salzburg
Organisers:Siegrid Schmidt, Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Mittelalterstudien (IZMS), Universität Salzburg
Käthe Sonnleitner, Institut für Geschichte, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Moderator/Chair:Jutta Baumgartner, Fachbereich Geschichte, Universität Salzburg
Paper 1330-aThe Christian Emperor: True Follower of Christ or Warrior for Christ?
(Language: English)
Käthe Sonnleitner, Institut für Geschichte, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Index terms: Crusades, Daily Life, Gender Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 1330-bCrusaders: Heroes, Daredevils, Adventurers, Cowards, and Deserters
(Language: English)
Ingrid Schlegl, Institut für Geschichte, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Index terms: Gender Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 1330-cThe Christian Knight: Brought up to Foster Nonviolent Virtues or to Wield the Sword
(Language: English)
Ilse Aiglsperger, Institut für Geschichte, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Index terms: Gender Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Abstract

In the Middle Ages, quite a number of conflicting requirements were imposed on ‘masculinities’. On the one hand, Christianity wanted men to be peaceful, merciful, and compassionate by following the example of Christ. On the other hand, medieval social structures required men of the nobility to be bellicose and ready for battle at all times. As a result, the identity of clerics differed widely from the identity of secular men. This caused clashes and conflicts. The difficulties to bridge theses extremities can be exemplified through the various ideologies of power, the crusading ideology and the educative literature. As secular men were influenced by the church, their bellicosity required constant renewal and justification. The church, by contrast, adopted bellicose ideas and left its early Christian roots behind.