IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 142: Myths in the Far North, I: Magic and Paganism in Scandinavia

Monday 6 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:'Creating the New North' Research Programme, Universitetet i Tromsø
Organiser:Richard Holt, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Moderator/Chair:Miriam Tveit, Fakultetet for Samfunnsvitenskap, Universitetet i Nordland
Paper 142-aThe Lapland Witches: European Images and Representations, 1150-1600
(Language: English)
Rune Blix Hagen, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Index terms: Folk Studies, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Mentalities
Paper 142-bJust How Pagan Were the Sámi at the End of the Middle Ages?
(Language: English)
Siv Rasmussen, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Mentalities, Pagan Religions
Paper 142-cArctic Encounters: Meetings with the Supernatural in the Old Norse Sagas
(Language: English)
Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough, Department of English Studies, Durham University
Index terms: Folk Studies, Geography and Settlement Studies, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Mentalities
Abstract

The Sámi people of northern Scandinavia had a reputation in the Middle Ages as magicians, perhaps largely as a result of their perceived pagan identity. Long after the Norse peoples had become Christian, the Sámi were believed to have held to their shamanistic religion – although there is good reason to believe that by the end of the Middle Ages Christianity had made a considerable impact on their religious faith and practices. The association of the North with trolls and other supernatural forces became a distinctive theme in northern literature and the geographical worldview of medieval Icelanders.