IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1503: Ambiguous Women in Medieval Art, I

Thursday 9 July 2015, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Medieval & Renaissance Research Group, University of Louisville, Kentucky
Organiser:Mónica Ann Walker Vadillo, Hite Art Institute, University of Louisville, Kentucky
Moderator/Chair:Mónica Ann Walker Vadillo, Hite Art Institute, University of Louisville, Kentucky
Paper 1503-aKing Solomon's Ambiguous Wife in the Queste del Saint Graal
(Language: English)
Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Gender Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1503-bDisease Woman: A Neutral Representation of Illness?
(Language: English)
Sara Oberg Stradal, School of Culture & Creative Art (History of Art), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Gender Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1503-cControlling Sexuality, Exalting Motherhood: The Marginal Bestiary in Charlotte of Savoy's Book of Hours
(Language: English)
Mónica Ann Walker Vadillo, Hite Art Institute, University of Louisville, Kentucky
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Gender Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Women appear quite frequently in medieval art from the Early Christian period all the way to the Late Middle Ages. Some of these images present in some cases a positive image of woman, but in other cases, women can embody very negative connotations. Yet in the highly symbolic world of the Middle Ages some women could embody a type of ambiguity that could be reflected in and through art. These women defied the logic of the dichotomy of good/evil, and their existence or visual representation could become a vehicle for multiple interpretations. These sessions will explore the sites of ambiguity connected not only to women as subjects of medieval art, but also the idea of women as patrons and makers of art and how their agency could place them between what was acceptable and what was frown upon.