IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1521: Beyond Feudalism: Rethinking Normative Orders, I - Possession, Hierarchy, Habitus?: Creating Bonds with Armed Men in Early Medieval Europe

Thursday 9 July 2015, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Cluster of Excellence 'Normative Orders', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Organiser:Daniel Föller, Exzellenzcluster 'Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Moderator/Chair:Charles West, Department of History, University of Sheffield
Paper 1521-aSeniores and Homines: Warriors in the Carolingian Capitularies
(Language: English)
Christoph Haack, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Index terms: Administration, Law, Military History, Social History
Paper 1521-bAn Invisible Bond?: Exploring the Habitus of Armed Men in the Carolingian Period
(Language: English)
Daniel Föller, Exzellenzcluster 'Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Index terms: Mentalities, Military History, Political Thought, Social History
Paper 1521-cEstablishing Bonds: The Relevance of Tenure for Interpersonal Relationships under Ottonian Rulership
(Language: English)
Tobias Grüßing, Fachbereich Geschichtswissenschaft, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Abstract

20 years after the publication of Susan Reynolds’s ground-breaking study Fiefs and Vassals, her deconstruction of feudalism as a basic normative order of Medieval Europe is commonly accepted. Nonetheless, since her alternative suggestions did not equally succeed, many central aspects of Medieval European societies at the moment remain somewhat amorphous. In the first of our two sessions on Medieval normative orders beyond feudalism, we are therefore focusing on how interpersonal bonds with armed men were created in Early Medieval societies once thought to have been dominated by feudal levies, namely the Carolingian and Ottonian Empires respectively. In what kind of hierarchic relations were these (potential) military actors included? Which role played the transfer of property? And how important were other factors for these bonds, e.g. a shared lifestyle?