IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1613: Shifting Definitions of Medieval Epistolarity in Theory and Practice, II: The Implications of the Ars Dictaminis

Thursday 9 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Prato Consortium for Medieval & Renaissance Studies
Organiser:Laura Carlson, Department of History, Queen's University, Ontario
Moderator/Chair:Diana Marie Jeske, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Paper 1613-aThe Postulate of Thematic Unity and the Curious Case of Arnulf of Lisieux's Letter 'Quam utilis apud principes'
(Language: English)
Isabel Blumenroth, Historisches Institut, Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1613-bEpistolary In-Groups: Textual Communities and Administrative Correspondence in 13th-Century England
(Language: English)
Kathleen Neal, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1613-cTogether but Apart: Approaching Separation in High Medieval Letters of Intimacy
(Language: English)
Diana Marie Jeske, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Social History
Abstract

These three sessions investigate the parameters and problems of medieval letters as a genre, specifically the porous definition of letters throughout the medieval period (i.e. their varying application as legal contracts, sermons, etc.). Speakers will comment on methodological approaches and challenges scholars encounter when using letters as source material. Papers also will address how this permeability challenges our interpretation of these documents as well as the medieval understanding of the letter itself and its potential use. The second of these sessions studies the impact (or lack thereof) of the ars dictaminis within the high medieval milieu; a study in contrast between the newly fixed parameters of epistolarity and increasingly wider applications of the letter and epistolary networks.