IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1614: Missionaries and Pagans in the Early Middle Ages: Sessions in Honour of Ian N. Wood, VI

Thursday 9 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Organisers:Tim Barnwell, School of History, University of Leeds / Kısmet Press, Leeds
Ricky Broome, Leeds Institute for Clinical Trials Research (LICTR), University of Leeds
N Yavuz, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Marco Mostert, Onderzoekinstituut voor Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Respondent:Niels Lund, Department of History, SAXO-Institute, Københavns Universitet
Paper 1614-a'I am the one who knows': Pride and Prejudice in the Christianisation of Pannonian and Moravian Slavs in the 9th Century
(Language: English)
Anna Kuznetsova, Institute of Slavic Studies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Pagan Religions, Religious Life
Paper 1614-bWillibrord: A Missionary Life
(Language: English)
Rob Meens, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Hagiography, Pagan Religions, Religious Life
Paper 1614-cTouch Wood: The Missionary Life in Bavaria
(Language: English)
Maximilian Diesenberger, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Hagiography, Pagan Religions, Religious Life
Abstract

This sixth session in honour of Ian N. Wood takes its subject matter from his seminal monograph The Missionary Life: Saints and the Evangelisation of Europe, 400-1500 (Longman, 2001). With this book and numerous articles on the subject, Wood shed new light on the impact of saints’ lives and immensely contributed to the modern understanding of Christianisation of Europe especially in the frontier zones of the Frankish world.

In this session, Anna Kuznetsova will focus on education of newly Christianised people in 9th-century Central Europe in light of both recent archaeological discoveries in Zalavar, Hungary and written sources. Rob Meens will investigate the activities of the Anglo-Saxon missionary Willibrord, the first archbishop of the Frisians, with particular attention to the framing of his life in the Vita Willibrordi by Alcuin. Finally, Maximilian Diesenberger will draw on Wood’s approach in adding new evidence from early medieval Bavaria.