IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1616: Cartularies and Reform: Monastic Responses to Episcopal Threats in High Medieval Iberia

Thursday 9 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:David Peterson, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco
Moderator/Chair:Francesca Tinti, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Vitoria-Gasteiz
Paper 1616-aTurning the Bishop away but Letting the King in: The Livro de Mumadona of Guimarães in the Changing Scenario of the 1070s
(Language: English)
André Evangelista Marques, Institute of Medieval Studies, NOVA University of Lisbon
Index terms: Administration, Archives and Sources, Charters and Diplomatics, Ecclesiastical History
Paper 1616-bMonastic Privileges against Episcopal Rights: Conflict and Defence Strategies in the Cartularies of the Monastery of Sahagún, 11th-13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Leticia Agúndez San Miguel, Department of Medieval, Modern & American History, University of the Basque Country
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Monasticism
Paper 1616-cFrom Abbot-Bishops to Abbots against Bishops: San Millán and Calahorra, 1050-1200 - The Story of a Messy Ecclesiastical Divorce
(Language: English)
David Peterson, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Monasticism
Abstract

The boom in monastic cartulary production from the late 11th century onwards has sometimes been regarded as a side-effect of the Gregorian Reform. However, rather than being simply the result of the desire to set the respective houses (and indeed archives) in order, what we encounter repeatedly across north-western Iberia is that this fashionable genre was also employed in the defence of monastic rights against episcopal claims, often themselves, ironically, the result of diocesan reform. In this session, we will contemplate three different case studies (Guimarães in Portugal, and Sahagún and San Millán in Spain) in which diocesan-monastic conflicts act as triggers for the production of cartularies.