IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1621: Beyond Feudalism: Rethinking Normative Orders, II - Property, Tenure, and the Legal Revolution in Medieval Europe

Thursday 9 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Cluster of Excellence 'Normative Orders', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Organiser:Daniel Föller, Exzellenzcluster 'Die Herausbildung normativer Ordnungen', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Moderator/Chair:Steffen Patzold, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Paper 1621-aA New Feudal Law?: Traces of the Legal Revolution in Royal Charters of the Empire in the 12th Century
(Language: English)
Jürgen Dendorfer, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Law, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1621-bFiefs and Fief-Holders in 12th/13th-Century Bamberg: The Influence of the Legal Revolution on Concepts of Property
(Language: English)
Sebastian Kalla, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Ecclesiastical History, Law
Paper 1621-cThe Consuetudines feudorum as a Source for the 'Formation of Feudalism', c. 1150-1250
(Language: English)
Rüdiger Lorenz, Universität Freiburg, Historisches Seminar, Abt. Landesgeschichte
Index terms: Education, Law, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Political Thought
Paper 1621-dCustomary Law and Private Feudal Registers North of the Alps: Norm and Practice in the 14th Century
(Language: English)
Marco Veronesi, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Abstract

20 years after the publication of Susan Reynolds’s ground-breaking study Fiefs and Vassals, her deconstruction of feudalism as a basic normative order of Medieval Europe is commonly accepted. Nonetheless, since her alternative suggestions did not equally succeed, many central aspects of Medieval European societies at the moment remain somewhat amorphous. In the second of our two sessions on Medieval normative orders beyond feudalism, we are asking how the codifications of customary law from the 12th century onwards affected practices of property. Which role did the earliest collections of feudal regulations from Northern Italy play within the process we are used to call the ‘Formation of Feudalism’? Can we trace the impact of these texts in practices of property as documented by charter evidence? And how did the codification of vernacular law books during the 13th century affected these practices?