IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1622: Reform and Renewal in East and Central Europe: Law and Politics, VI - Transylvania and the Banate in the Middle Ages: Archaeology, Laws, and Interpretations

Thursday 9 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Research Group for Medievistics (Hungarian Academy of Science / National Archives of Hungary / University of Szeged / Center for Transylvanian Studies, Romanian Academy of Sciences, Cluj-Napoca)
Organisers:Éva B. Halász, Magyar Medievisztikai Kutatócsoport, Budapest - Szeged
Alexandru Simon, Center for Transylvanian Studies, Romanian Academy of Sciences, Cluj-Napoca
Moderator/Chair:Ioan Marian Ţiplic, Faculty of History & Patrimony, Universitatea Lucian Blaga, Sibiu
Paper 1622-a'New Dawn Fades': Observations Regarding the Early Migration Period in Transylvania
(Language: English)
Vlad Andrei Lăzărescu, Institute of Archaeology & the History of Art, Romanian Academy, Cluj-Napoca
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies
Paper 1622-bUniversitas Valachorum: Privilege and Community in Medieval Banat
(Language: English)
Adrian Magina, Center for Transylvanian Studies, Romanian Academy of Sciences, Cluj-Napoca
Paper 1622-cStages of Urban Authonomy in the Transylvanian Border Area
(Language: English)
Livia Magina, Center for Transylvanian Studies, Romanian Academy of Sciences, Cluj-Napoca
Paper 1622-dFrom Necropolis to Fortification: The Late Medieval Walls of Cluj and Their Roman Grounds
(Language: English)
Cosmin Onofrei, Institute of Archaeology & the History of Art, Romanian Academy, Cluj-Napoca
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General
Abstract

The session explores from three different topical (archaeology, urbanization and custom), as well as chronological angles (the post-Roman period, the High and the Late Middle Ages) the features of communities that inhabited for longer or shorter time spans the territories which became the eastern parts of the Hungarian realm and are most commonly known as the Banate and Transylvania. The presentations aim at creating the necessary background for a much needed interdisciplinary study of these features and of the regions that they came to define.