IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 1709: God and the State: The Archdiocese of Nidaros and Temporal Power, 1430-1520

Thursday 9 July 2015, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Institutt for historie og klassiske fag, Norges Teknisk-Naturvitenskapelige Universitet, Trondheim
Organiser:Magne Njåstad, Department of Historical Studies, Norwegian University of Science & Technology, Trondheim
Moderator/Chair:Richard Holt, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Paper 1709-aKing and Chapter: The Prolonged Election of Archbishop Olav Trondsson, 1449-1458
(Language: English)
Magne Njåstad, Department of Historical Studies, Norwegian University of Science & Technology, Trondheim
Index terms: Administration, Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1709-bMissed Opportunities?: How Did the King Manage His Interests in the Far North?
(Language: English)
Sigrun Høgetveit Berg, Department of Archaeology, History, Religious Studies and Theology, The Arctic University of Norwa
Index terms: Administration, Ecclesiastical History, Economics - Trade, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1709-cForeign Bishops and Local Elites in Late Medieval Iceland
(Language: English)
Susann Anett Pedersen, Department of Historical Studies, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Trondheim
Index terms: Administration, Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The session will deal with different aspects of temporal power and conflicts of interest in the post-conciliar period in the Nidaros province. The attempted reforms of the church in the conciliar period to some extent liberated the church-provinces from the centralized policies of the papacy. The council of Basel shifted power from the curia to the episcopal level, and in a later stage laid the ground for arrangements between church provinces and princes on a ‘national’ level. The union of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden had removed the central government and king from Norway, potentially giving the council of the realm increased political power. The council was dominated by the bishops and the archbishop. Looser ties to Rome and a remote central administration thus gave the archbishop opportunities to increase his political influence and extend his temporal power.