IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 212: The Resolution of Conflict and Dispute in the Middle Ages, I: Reconciliation in the Earlier Middle Ages

Monday 6 July 2015, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Albert Fenton, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Moderator/Chair:Paul J. Kershaw, Department of History, University of Virginia
Paper 212-aFemale Monasticism as Legal Puzzle in Merovingian Gaul: Solving the Revolt at Sainte-Croix, 589-590
(Language: English)
Jake Purcell, Department of History, Columbia University
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Monasticism, Politics and Diplomacy, Religious Life
Paper 212-b'With honour, and in a friendly manner': Evidence for the Release of Hostages in Text and Practice
(Language: English)
Alice Hicklin, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Military History, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 212-cCrime, Treaties, and Diplomatic Practice in the Earlier Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Jenny Benham, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Index terms: Administration, Law, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Abstract

This session, the first in a two-part series, will explore the mechanisms through which reconciliation was achieved in the earlier Middle Ages. The first paper takes as its focus Gregory of Tours’ account of the revolt at Ste Croix, examining the dispute’s simultaneous representation as both social event and abstract legal problem. The second paper discusses evidence for the release of hostages, questioning the rarity of accounts of hostage-release and exploring the textual function of such narratives. The final paper examines three understudied treaties from the earlier Middle Ages: the Treaty of Meerssen (870), the Treaty of Bonn (921), and the first Anglo-Norman treaty (991), comparing and contrasting the documents whilst exploring their connections to contemporary domestic law.