IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 304: Dynasticism in Medieval and Early Modern Europe and Beyond, III: Visual Culture and Dynasty in the Jagiellonian Era

Monday 6 July 2015, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:European Research Council Project 'The Jagiellonians: Dynasty, Memory & Identity in Central Europe', University of Oxford
Organisers:Ilya Afanasyev, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Seth Adam Hindin, The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH), University of Oxford
Moderator/Chair:Zoë Opačić, Department of History of Art, Birkbeck, University of London
Paper 304-aDynastic Images and Poetic Words: On Gedimind/Jagiellonian Representations in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania
(Language: English)
Giedre Mickunaite, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Index terms: Art History - General, Political Thought
Paper 304-bBetween Jagiellonians and Vasas: Visualizing Catherine Jagiellon
(Language: English)
Susanna Niiranen, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Index terms: Art History - General, Gender Studies, Mentalities, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 304-cDynastic Change, Visual Continuity: Jagiellonians, Habsburgs, and Prague Castle
(Language: English)
Sarah Lynch, Department of Art & Archaeology, Princeton University / Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, München
Index terms: Architecture - General, Art History - General
Abstract

The accession of Grand Duke Jogaila of Lithuania to the Polish throne as King Władysław II Jagiełlo (r. 1386-1434) – replacing the previous Piast and Angevin dynasties – inaugurated a period of approximately two hundred years during which dynastic changes occurred with unusual frequency throughout Europe, from the rise of the Tudors in England and Bourbons in France to the Jagiellonians and Habsburgs in several nations of East-Central Europe. This panel is dedicated to the visual strategies used by late medieval and Renaissance dynasties to legitimate themselves politically, to claim particular dynastic origins, affinities, and alliances, and to emphasize particular relationships within and without the dynasty while eliding others.