IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 502: New Directions in Manuscript Studies: Queer Readings‬, I

Tuesday 7 July 2015, 09.00-10.30

Organisers:Roberta Magnani, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Diane Watt, School of Literature & Languages, University of Surrey
Moderator/Chair:Liz Herbert McAvoy, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Paper 502-aQueering Medieval Manuscripts: Anachronism, Asynchrony, and Agency
(Language: English)
Angela Bennett Segler, Department of English, University of Nevada, Reno
Index terms: Gender Studies, Language and Literature - Middle English, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 502-bQueer Futurities: Reorienting Adam Scriveyn
(Language: English)
Jonathan Hsy, GW Digital Humanities Institute, George Washington University, Washington, DC
Index terms: Gender Studies, Language and Literature - Middle English, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 502-cGower Out of Time and Place
(Language: English)
Malte Urban, School of English, Queen's University Belfast
Index terms: Gender Studies, Language and Literature - Middle English, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 502-dOn the Edge: Chaucer and Gower's Queer Glosses
(Language: English)
Diane Watt, School of Literature & Languages, University of Surrey
Roberta Magnani, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Over twenty years ago Carolyn Dinshaw argued for a queering of Chaucer’s manuscripts. More recently, the framing of medieval studies through queer theory has offered valuable avenues of investigation which have pushed forward Dinshaw’s work (studies by Anna Klosowska, Steven Kruger, Glenn Burger, Karma Lochrie, Tison Pugh, Diane Watt, to mention but a few). Dinshaw’s initial engagement with the materiality of Chaucer’s manuscripts and, in particular, with their queer margins has, however, been largely neglected. These sessions seek to re-assess the field of medieval manuscript studies in the light of recent theoretical concerns which bring into focus the multiple ways in which medieval codices encounter and manifest the queer.