IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 525: Power & Institutions in Medieval Islam & Christendom (PIMIC), I: (Re)Writing the Past - Memory and Political Culture in East and West

Tuesday 7 July 2015, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Power & Institutions in Medieval Islam & Christendom (PIMIC), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Madrid
Organiser:Sarah Greer, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Moderator/Chair:Jinty Nelson, Department of History, King's College London
Paper 525-aReassessing the Past in the Primordia of Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim
(Language: English)
Sarah Greer, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Monasticism, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 525-bArabic Biographical Dictionaries as Archives of the Scholarly Community?: Ibn ʿAsākir's History of Damascus
(Language: English)
Paula Manstetten, Department of the Languages & Cultures of the Near & Middle East, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 525-cRemembering the Future: Genealogical Authority in the Carolingian World
(Language: English)
Stuart Airlie, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Historiography - Medieval
Abstract

This strand examines the themes of memory, historiography, and identity from a comparative perspective as part of five sessions organised by the Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom research project. It interrogates the political, social, and cultural use of history writing and the active role of authors in constructing narratives and transforming the past to renew the present. By focusing on examples of history writing from Ottonian Saxony, 12th-century Damascus and the Carolingian world, the three papers explore different expressions of institutional memory, construction of community identities and representation and renegotiation of the past across the medieval world.