IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 527: The Impact of Religious Reform on the Romanesque Art of Aragón

Tuesday 7 July 2015, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Research Project 'Art & Religious Reforms in Medieval Spain' (HAR2012-38037), Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Organiser:Marta Poza Yagüe, Departamento de Historia del Arte I (Medieval), Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Moderator/Chair:Ana Hernández Ferreirós, Departamento de Historia del Arte I (Medieval), Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Paper 527-aThe Long Shadow of Rome: The Architecture of Jaca Cathedral and the Gregorian Reform
(Language: English)
Javier Martínez de Aguirre, Departamento de Historia del Arte I (Medieval), Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - General, Ecclesiastical History
Paper 527-bPortraying the Clergy in the Age of Reform: Images from Urban Aragón
(Language: English)
Julia Perratore, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Sculpture, Religious Life
Paper 527-cVisual Hagiography and the Politics of Renewal and Reform in Romanesque Aragon
(Language: English)
Francisco de Asís García García, Departamento de Historia del Arte I (Medieval), Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Index terms: Art History - General, Ecclesiastical History, Hagiography
Abstract

The kingdom of Aragón acted as a bridge between the Iberian Peninsula and Europe in the central Middle Ages, thus displaying an openness to innovations arriving from beyond the Pyrenees, among which was the new Romanesque style received quite early in the territory. This was especially true for the Gregorian Reform, which impacted greatly on the Aragonese monarchs and prelates, eager to connect themselves with the spititual renovation issued from Rome, but each pursuing their own agendas. In their effort they used art as a method, among others, to show their commitment with the new principles dispensed by the papacy. This session will examine some of these instances, ranging from the architectural solutions of the cathedral of Jaca, to the representation of saints and clergy in artwork that visually associated Aragón with the reform.